© 2019. Shackleton Aviation Group (CIC) Company No. 10598129

FLY

Avro Shackleton WR963 last felt air under her wings on 9 July 1991. The most recent Shackleton flight to date took place in December 2009, in the USA. Follow the story as we make steady progress in ensuring that it wasn't the last.

The Shackleton Aviation Group is currently preparing a restoration programme for Avro Shackleton WR963 with the ultimate goal of having an airworthy airframe to display around the country to all generations.

 

Preserving an aircraft in a museum is a credible achievement. However if the situation is available that allows you to bring this aircraft to the general public all over the country, allowing all to experience the sights, sounds and smells of a Cold War Warrior, surely its only right to give your very best to achieve this. 

The aircraft will be worked on throughout the summer months, covering small items to maintain a level of serviceability in between engine and taxi runs. When resources and funding are sufficient, in depth maintenance will be carried out during the winter months. The project is initially estimated to cost around £2 - £3 million, funding raised solely through Engines Runs, Taxi Rides, Donations, Merchandise Sales and other charitable funding we can secure along our journey. 

We currently have funding ring-fenced for the NDT (Non-Destructive Testing) requirement as laid down by the CAA. This will be used as and when it is required as per the restoration schedule. We estimate this will be done in a number of different 'Stages', such as smaller isolated areas of testing identified during the inspection phases and areas requiring testing as per the CAA requirements.

While we have a plan for raising funds, if you can spare any money to donate to this worthy cause, its people like you that can make this project a reality. 

"“For scientific discovery give me Scott; for speed and efficiency of travel give me Amundsen; but when disaster strikes and all hope is gone, get down on your knees and pray for Shackleton.”

Sir Raymond Priestly, Antarctic Explorer and Geologist